Combined pill - NHS - oral contraceptive pill

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oral contraceptive pill - Estrogen And Progestin Oral Contraceptives (Oral Route) Description and Brand Names - Mayo Clinic


Birth control pills are an oral pill that a woman can take every day to prevent pregnancy. Birth control pills stop the ovaries from releasing eggs and thickens the cervical mucus, which keeps sperm from fertilizing the egg. Birth control pills come in two forms: combination pills contain two hormones, Author: afterworld.info Estrogen and Progestin (Oral Contraceptives) Before taking oral contraceptives, Be sure to mention any of the following: acetaminophen (APAP, Oral contraceptives may cause side effects. Some side effects can be serious. The following symptoms are uncommon.

Birth control pills (oral contraceptives) are prescription medications that prevent pregnancy. Three combinations of birth control pills that contain progestin and estrogen are 1) monophasic, 2) biphasic, and 3) triphasic. Birth control pills may also be prescribed to reduce menstrual cramps or prevent anemia. Oral contraceptives are known also as the Pill, OCs, BCs, BC tablets, or birth control pills. This medicine usually contains two types of hormones, estrogens and progestins and, when taken properly, prevents pregnancy. It works by stopping a woman's egg from fully developing each month.

The combined oral contraceptive pill is usually just called "the pill". It contains artificial versions of female hormones oestrogen and progesterone, which women produce naturally in their ovaries. A woman can get pregnant if a man's sperm reaches one of her eggs (ova). Article Sections. Oral contraceptive pills are widely used and are generally safe and effective for many women. The World Health Organization has developed a risk classification system to help physicians advise patients about the safety of oral contraceptive pills. The choice of pill formulation is influenced by clinical afterworld.info by:

There are two main types of oral contraceptive pills. The combined pill contains two hormones and stops the ovaries releasing an egg each month. The progestogen-only pill (mini pill) has only one hormone and works by changing the mucus at the entrance to the womb (uterus) so that sperm cannot pass through to fertilise the egg. The hormones in the pill stop ovulation. No ovulation means there’s no egg hanging around for sperm to fertilize, so pregnancy can’t happen. The pill’s hormones also thicken the mucus on the cervix. Thicker cervical mucus makes it hard for the sperm to swim to .

Birth control pills, patches, and vaginal rings are all medications. Always tell your doctor or pharmacist you are on the pill, patch, or vaginal ring if you see him or her for any reason.